The Luxor Temple is located on the eastern bank of the River Nile in Luxor - In the past, this site was the famous city of Thebes (the City of a Hundred Gates)

The Luxor Temple is located on the eastern bank of the River Nile in Luxor - In the past, this site was the famous city of Thebes (the City of a Hundred Gates)

Entrance of the Luxor Temple - this temple was built by Amenhotep III (1390-52 BC) but completed by Tutankhamun (1336-27 BC) and Horemheb (1323-1295 BC) and then added to by Rameses II (1279-13 BC)

Entrance of the Luxor Temple - this temple was built by Amenhotep III (1390-52 BC) but completed by Tutankhamun (1336-27 BC) and Horemheb (1323-1295 BC) and then added to by Rameses II (1279-13 BC)

Hundreds of sphinxes once lined the road to all the way to the Karnak Temple

Hundreds of sphinxes once lined the road to all the way to the Karnak Temple

This road was also called the Avenue of Sphinxes - the old capital of the ancient Egyptian kingdom was on the banks of the Nile with six temples (two on the eastern bank and four on the west)

This road was also called the Avenue of Sphinxes - the old capital of the ancient Egyptian kingdom was on the banks of the Nile with six temples (two on the eastern bank and four on the west)

This site was also used as the Coptic church during the Christian era - the temple was buried beneath the streets and houses of Luxor

This site was also used as the Coptic church during the Christian era - the temple was buried beneath the streets and houses of Luxor

In the ancient times, this temple was surrounded by the mud houses and shops but none of them survived the test of time

In the ancient times, this temple was surrounded by the mud houses and shops but none of them survived the test of time

Statues beside the first pylon - there used to be two granite obelisks at the entrance but only one stand today, the other one was brought to Paris

Statues beside the first pylon - there used to be two granite obelisks at the entrance but only one stand today, the other one was brought to Paris

Pigeons resting on the first pylon with a faceless statue in the foreground

Pigeons resting on the first pylon with a faceless statue in the foreground

A pedestal of a missing statue, it was carved out of black granite

A pedestal of a missing statue, it was carved out of black granite

A piece of obelisk, carved out of pink granite sits at the entrance of the Luxor Temple

A piece of obelisk, carved out of pink granite sits at the entrance of the Luxor Temple

The four sacred baboons who greet the morning sun are carved on the pedestal

The four sacred baboons who greet the morning sun are carved on the pedestal

This main entrance to the temple complex was originally flanked by six colossal statues of Ramesses

This main entrance to the temple complex was originally flanked by six colossal statues of Ramesses

Four seated statues and two standing but only two seated statues have survived

Four seated statues and two standing but only two seated statues have survived

Wall inscriptions on the First pylon depict the victories of Ramesses II - this pylon is 70 feet in height

Wall inscriptions on the First pylon depict the victories of Ramesses II - this pylon is 70 feet in height

A statue beside the 24 meter high first pylon - it was built by Ramesses II

A statue beside the 24 meter high first pylon - it was built by Ramesses II

Through the pylon gateway leads into a peristyle courtyard, also built by Ramesses II

Through the pylon gateway leads into a peristyle courtyard, also built by Ramesses II

A massive statue at entrance of the corridor - in the background a minaret of a mosque can be seen

A massive statue at entrance of the corridor - in the background a minaret of a mosque can be seen

These columns were decorated with various scenes from the past

These columns were decorated with various scenes from the past

This court is composed of a colonnade including a number of colossal statues of Amenhotep III which were usurped by Ramesses II

This court is composed of a colonnade including a number of colossal statues of Amenhotep III which were usurped by Ramesses II

This courtyard was constructed to preserved the shrines constructed by Hatshepsut

This courtyard was constructed to preserved the shrines constructed by Hatshepsut

Relief on one of the statues of Ramesses II, showing two figures of the God Hapi, one representing Upper Egypt with the Papyrus on his head, and one representing Lower Egypt with Lotus on his head, tying Lotus and Papyrus

Relief on one of the statues of Ramesses II, showing two figures of the God Hapi, one representing Upper Egypt with the Papyrus on his head, and one representing Lower Egypt with Lotus on his head, tying Lotus and Papyrus

The mosque of Sufi Shaykh Yusuf Abu al-Hajjaj was built over the temple ruins now it has become part of the complex

The mosque of Sufi Shaykh Yusuf Abu al-Hajjaj was built over the temple ruins now it has become part of the complex

An elderly accompanied by a guide while a local (who often ask for money) looks on

An elderly accompanied by a guide while a local (who often ask for money) looks on

Partially destroyed statues inside the Luxor Temple

Partially destroyed statues inside the Luxor Temple

Amenhotep's colonnade was built by Amenhotep III of the New Kingdom's 18th Dynasty to be the grand entrance to the Temple of Amen of the Opet

Amenhotep's colonnade was built by Amenhotep III of the New Kingdom's 18th Dynasty to be the grand entrance to the Temple of Amen of the Opet

Amenhotep's Colonnade is seen on the left were fourteen great columns but they were completed after the death of the king

Amenhotep's Colonnade is seen on the left were fourteen great columns but they were completed after the death of the king

These old photographs on one of the walls of the Luxor Temple show how renovation work was done in the past

These old photographs on one of the walls of the Luxor Temple show how renovation work was done in the past

This hypostyle hall leads to a smaller eight columned hall or portico which originally opened into the inner temple, but which was transformed by the Roman legion stationed at Luxor into a chapel dedicated to the imperial cult

This hypostyle hall leads to a smaller eight columned hall or portico which originally opened into the inner temple, but which was transformed by the Roman legion stationed at Luxor into a chapel dedicated to the imperial cult

A pigeon resting above a pillar's capital

A pigeon resting above a pillar's capital

These walls are decorated with scenes depicting the stages of the Opet Festival

These walls are decorated with scenes depicting the stages of the Opet Festival

Here the Opet Festival is depicted in lively detail, with the pharaoh, nobility and common people joining the triumphal procession

Here the Opet Festival is depicted in lively detail, with the pharaoh, nobility and common people joining the triumphal procession

Carving of the scenes and inscriptions on the walls behind the columns

Carving of the scenes and inscriptions on the walls behind the columns

There was also some renovation work being carried out on the monument

There was also some renovation work being carried out on the monument

All of the coulmns were inscribed with various scenes and it took many years to complete this work

All of the coulmns were inscribed with various scenes and it took many years to complete this work

A cluster of the columns in one of the inner rooms - it is also believed that Alexander the Great added few touches to this building

A cluster of the columns in one of the inner rooms - it is also believed that Alexander the Great added few touches to this building

Amenhotep IV tried to to dispose of the traditional ancient Egyptian religion in favor of a new one focused on the Sun Disk, called the Aten

Amenhotep IV tried to to dispose of the traditional ancient Egyptian religion in favor of a new one focused on the Sun Disk, called the Aten

After his death, his probable son, Tutankhamun, almost certainly under the direction of elder advisors (Horemheb and Ay), reinstated the old religion and in turn attempted to erase both the memory of Akhenaten and his religion

After his death, his probable son, Tutankhamun, almost certainly under the direction of elder advisors (Horemheb and Ay), reinstated the old religion and in turn attempted to erase both the memory of Akhenaten and his religion

Graffiti on one of the columns - in the past it was a fashion to leave one's mark on this historical site

Graffiti on one of the columns - in the past it was a fashion to leave one's mark on this historical site

Top of a column with it's fading colours

Top of a column with it's fading colours

Column colonnade in the Great Court of Ramesses II

Column colonnade in the Great Court of Ramesses II

The Great Sun Court of Amenhotep IIIs measures about 45.11 by 56.08 meters

The Great Sun Court of Amenhotep IIIs measures about 45.11 by 56.08 meters

This puppy was sitting on the grounds of the Luxor Temple - he seemed to be little annoyed with something

This puppy was sitting on the grounds of the Luxor Temple - he seemed to be little annoyed with something

A deserted cafe inside the Luxor Temple complex

A deserted cafe inside the Luxor Temple complex

After coming out of the temple, I took this path on the left which brought me beside the River Nile

After coming out of the temple, I took this path on the left which brought me beside the River Nile