Building of Marble Throne is located opposite the ticket office - this is the first building which one sees when facing the palace

Building of Marble Throne is located opposite the ticket office - this is the first building which one sees when facing the palace

Golestan Palace is a collection of many royal buildings in Tehran - first castle (arg) on this site was built by Tahmasb I (Safavid dynasty) in the 16th century

Golestan Palace is a collection of many royal buildings in Tehran - first castle (arg) on this site was built by Tahmasb I (Safavid dynasty) in the 16th century

Later, Karim Khan Zand and Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar renovated and added more buildings to this site

Later, Karim Khan Zand and Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar renovated and added more buildings to this site

The Qajar chose Tehran as their capital thus making the Golestan Palace official residence of the royal Qajar family

The Qajar chose Tehran as their capital thus making the Golestan Palace official residence of the royal Qajar family

The current palace was built around 1865 and each building requires a separate ticket to visit (bought from the ticket office)

The current palace was built around 1865 and each building requires a separate ticket to visit (bought from the ticket office)

Nasser al-Din Shah (r 184896) built this Palace of Flowers (Golestan Palace) that included offices, ministries and private living quarters

Nasser al-Din Shah (r 184896) built this Palace of Flowers (Golestan Palace) that included offices, ministries and private living quarters

Walking along the long pool one comes face to face with the Marble Throne (Takht e Marmar)

Walking along the long pool one comes face to face with the Marble Throne (Takht e Marmar)

The Marble Throne, was built in 1806 by order of Fath Ali Shah of Qajar (r. 1797-1834)

The Marble Throne, was built in 1806 by order of Fath Ali Shah of Qajar (r. 1797-1834)

Takht e Marmar is surrounded by paintings, marble-carvings, tile-work, stucco, mirrors, enamel, woodcarvings and lattice windows

Takht e Marmar is surrounded by paintings, marble-carvings, tile-work, stucco, mirrors, enamel, woodcarvings and lattice windows

Qajar royals would use this section of arg to hold coronations and other ceremonies

Qajar royals would use this section of arg to hold coronations and other ceremonies

The throne is supported by human figures and constructed from 65 pieces of yellow alabaster mined in Yazd

The throne is supported by human figures and constructed from 65 pieces of yellow alabaster mined in Yazd

Standing in front of the Marble Throne, one is smitten by the beauty of this audience hall

Standing in front of the Marble Throne, one is smitten by the beauty of this audience hall

This is the finest example of the Iranian architecture

This is the finest example of the Iranian architecture

Decorated walls beside the Marble Throne - attention to details is second to none

Decorated walls beside the Marble Throne - attention to details is second to none

A side view of the Takht e Marmar - visitors are coming to see this beautiful palace

A side view of the Takht e Marmar - visitors are coming to see this beautiful palace

The building next to the Marble Throne is known as Khalvat-e Karim Khani (Karim Khan Nook)

The building next to the Marble Throne is known as Khalvat-e Karim Khani (Karim Khan Nook)

This building was constructed in 1759 and it was also the part of the private quarters of Karim Khan Zand

This building was constructed in 1759 and it was also the part of the private quarters of Karim Khan Zand

A small marble throne sits on one side of the building and it is surrounded by colourful tiles

A small marble throne sits on one side of the building and it is surrounded by colourful tiles

Nasser al Din Shah was fond of this corner of the Golestan Palace and he spent much of his time here

Nasser al Din Shah was fond of this corner of the Golestan Palace and he spent much of his time here

This is grave of Nasser al Din Shah and he is buried at the place where he used to enjoy his free time

This is grave of Nasser al Din Shah and he is buried at the place where he used to enjoy his free time

Marble tombstone is built on a terrace with a small pond and a fountain in the middle

Marble tombstone is built on a terrace with a small pond and a fountain in the middle

A side view of the grave of Nasser al Din Shah

A side view of the grave of Nasser al Din Shah

Arches beside the grave of Nasser al Din Shah and this site is unique because it offers beautiful view of the palace gardens from the terrace

Arches beside the grave of Nasser al Din Shah and this site is unique because it offers beautiful view of the palace gardens from the terrace

Khalvat e Karim Khani is smaller than the Marble Throne room but it has very bright colours and low ceiling to add to it's beauty

Khalvat e Karim Khani is smaller than the Marble Throne room but it has very bright colours and low ceiling to add to it's beauty

Exterior of the Khalvat e Karim Khani - a dried pond (also known as Pond House) is in the middle

Exterior of the Khalvat e Karim Khani - a dried pond (also known as Pond House) is in the middle

Columns of the Khalvat e Karim Khani inside the Golestan Palace

Columns of the Khalvat e Karim Khani inside the Golestan Palace

A larger pond was built in front of the Khalvat e Karim Khani where water would roll from the terrace

A larger pond was built in front of the Khalvat e Karim Khani where water would roll from the terrace

Negar Khane Art museum is next to the Khalvat e Karim Khani - this section of the palace holds a collection of Qajar-era art

Negar Khane Art museum is next to the Khalvat e Karim Khani - this section of the palace holds a collection of Qajar-era art

Garden in front of the Negar Khane Art museum

Garden in front of the Negar Khane Art museum

Entrance of the Salam Hall (Talar e Salam) - this reception hall was built as a museum but later it was changed into a Reception Hall

Entrance of the Salam Hall (Talar e Salam) - this reception hall was built as a museum but later it was changed into a Reception Hall

Statues of lions at the entrance of the Salam Hall

Statues of lions at the entrance of the Salam Hall

This hall has exquisite mirrors work but photography was prohibited inside the hall

This hall has exquisite mirrors work but photography was prohibited inside the hall

A side view of the Salam Hall (Talar e Salam)

A side view of the Salam Hall (Talar e Salam)

Gallery or Negar Khaneh houses some of the art works but original work can be found in other museums

Gallery or Negar Khaneh houses some of the art works but original work can be found in other museums

One of the paintings inside the Gallery Hall

One of the paintings inside the Gallery Hall

This hall is plain yet beautiful with a chandelier in the middle

This hall is plain yet beautiful with a chandelier in the middle

Frame of this painting has elaborate decorations

Frame of this painting has elaborate decorations

Mirror work on the exterior of a building inside the Golestan Palace

Mirror work on the exterior of a building inside the Golestan Palace

Details of the mirror work

Details of the mirror work

Some parts of the palace were destroyed in the Pahlavi period and the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Finance was built in their place

Some parts of the palace were destroyed in the Pahlavi period and the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Finance was built in their place

During the Pahlavi era (1925-1979) Golestan Palace was used for formal royal receptions and the Pahlavi dynasty built their own palace at Niavaran

During the Pahlavi era (1925-1979) Golestan Palace was used for formal royal receptions and the Pahlavi dynasty built their own palace at Niavaran

The coronation of Reza Khan was held  in Takht-i Marmar

The coronation of Reza Khan was held in Takht-i Marmar

The coronation of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (r. 1941-deposed 1979) in the Museum Hall

The coronation of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (r. 1941-deposed 1979) in the Museum Hall

In between 1925 and 1945 a large portion of the buildings of the palace were destroyed on the orders of Reza Shah who believed that the centuries old Qajar palace should not hinder the growth of a modern city

In between 1925 and 1945 a large portion of the buildings of the palace were destroyed on the orders of Reza Shah who believed that the centuries old Qajar palace should not hinder the growth of a modern city

At present, Golestan Palace is the result of roughly 400 years construction and renovations

At present, Golestan Palace is the result of roughly 400 years construction and renovations

Now, it is protected under UNESCO's World Heritage List

Now, it is protected under UNESCO's World Heritage List

Details of one of the internal walls in the palace

Details of one of the internal walls in the palace

This palace is still a jaw dropping place to visit in Tehran

This palace is still a jaw dropping place to visit in Tehran